COLLEGE OF ALAMEDA COURSE OUTLINE

COLLEGE: STATE APPROVAL DATE:
ORIGINATOR: Patricia Nelson STATE CONTROL NUMBER: CCC000358194
BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVAL DATE: 06/14/2016
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE APPROVAL DATE: 09/01/2015
CURRENT EFFECTIVE DATE: 01/01/2017
 
DIVISION/DEPARTMENT:

1. REQUESTED CREDIT CLASSIFICATION:
  Credit - Degree Applicable
Course is not a basic skills course.
Program Applicable
2. DEPT/COURSE NO: 3. COURSE TITLE:
  ENGL 001A   Composition and Reading
4. COURSE: COA Course Changes in Catalog Info   TOP NO. 1501.00
5. UNITS: 4.000   HRS/WK LEC: 4.00 Total: 70.00
  HRS/WK LAB:

6. NO. OF TIMES OFFERED AS SELETED TOPIC:       AVERAGE ENROLLMENT:
7. JUSTIFICATION FOR COURSE:
  Course meets General Education requirements for UC and CSU systems; IGETC transfer requirements for Area 1A; and Peralta GE requirements in areas 4a and 4d.
8. COURSE/CATALOG DESCRIPTION
  Reading and writing of expository prose: Critical thinking, identifying logical fallacies, and reasoning inductively and deductively
9. OTHER CATALOG INFORMATION
 
  1. Modular: No     If yes, how many modules:
  2. Open entry/open exit: No
  3. Grading Policy: Letter Grade Only
  4. Eligible for credit by Exam: No
  5. Repeatable according to state guidelines: No
  6. Required for degree/certificate (specify):
    Existing - AA/AS area 4a, 4d, 4e, 4g
  7. Meets GE/Transfer requirements (specify):
    AA/AS area 4a, 4d 4e, 4g ; CSU area A2; IGETC area 1A;
  8. C-ID Number: ENGL 100 Expiration Date:

  9. Are there prerequisites/corequisites/recommended preparation for this course? Yes
    Date of last prereq/coreq validation: 08/25/2015
  10. Acceptable for Credit: CSU/UC
10. LIST STUDENT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (EXIT SKILLS): (Objectives must define the exit skills required of students and include criteria identified in Items 12, 14, and 15 - critical thinking, essay writing, problem solving, written/verbal communications, computational skills, working with others, workplace needs, SCANS competencies, all aspects of the industry, etc.)(See SCANS/All Aspects of Industry Worksheet.)

Students will be able to:
  1. Analyze college-level readings, discerning thesis statement, topic sentences, and details; recognize major techniques used to embody meaning; identify and understand a variety of rhetorical techniques; distinguish between fact and inference, and identify common fallacies in reasoning.
  2. Apply modes of development in writing unified, well-organized essays of 800-1,000 words or longer: such as persuasion, analysis, classification, comparison and contrast, definition, précis, and description with minimal errors in grammar, diction, spelling, and punctuation.
  3. Develop a research paper, evaluating and interpreting a variety of primary and secondary sources, demonstrating breadth of thinking necessary to handle complex issues, evaluating information for relevance and credibility, incorporating quotations and paraphrased passages, and providing current MLA citations.
  4. Construct meaning from oral, written, and graphic messages to understand the writing process of generating ideas, planning, drafting, editing, and revising essays.
  5. Create sentence variety and style, using such structures as relative clauses, appositives, verbal phrases, parallel structure, and subordinate clauses.
  6. Write timed essays in class, exhibiting acceptable college-level control of mechanics, organization, development and coherence.
  7. Proofread and edit essays for presentation so that they exhibit no disruptive errors in English grammar, useage, or punctuation.
11A. COURSE CONTENT: List major topics to be covered. This section must be more than listing chapter headings from a textbook. Outline the course content, including essential topics, major subdivisions, and supporting details. It should include enough information so that a faculty member from any institution will have a clear understanding of the material taught in the course and the approximate length of time devoted to each. There should be congruence among the catalog description, lecture and/or lab content, student performance objectives, and the student learning outcomes. List percent of time spent on each topic; ensure percentages total 100%.

LECTURE CONTENT:

Principles of essay composition for essays ranging from 600 to 1500 words in length, for a total of 6,000 words of formal writing: focusing on the  use of pre-writing,  drafting, composing, editing, and revising as well as  providing effective introduction, thesis, body paragraphs and conclusion; 40%

Principles of reading and responding critically, orally and in writing, to college-level readings, including literary essays, argumentative essays, and expository prose; 10%

Review of elements of mechanics, punctuation, and sentence structure with an emphasis on how these elements contribute to an effective sense of style and expression in the essay; 10%

Introduction to the principles of voice and style in writing, including selecting and audience to write for, developing and maintaining an appropriate level of diction, and recognizing and using stylistic techniques such as effective use of descriptive and figurative language; 10%

Principles of reading and responding effectively, orally and in writing, to book-length readings of fiction or non-fiction; 10%

Introduction to the essentials of argumentation and presentation of positions on issues and ideas, using evidence from readings and experience as well as the anticipation of objections to such arguments; 10%

Introduction to the essentials of library research and the effective use of citation and documentation of sources. 10%

11B. LAB CONTENT:

o    Lecture
o    Large and small-group discussion
o    Panel presentations
o    Online e-group exchange
o    Peer review
o    Film, video, and digital media
o    In-class and out-of-class reading and writing responses
o    Instructor-student conferences

12. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION (List methods used to present course content.)
  1. Lecture
  2. Multimedia Content
  3. Projects
  4. Other (Specify)
  5. Activity
  6. Distance Education

  7. Other Methods:
    Group and individual activities to hone critical thinking, proofreading, prewriting and research skills. Instructor-led lecture to introduce expository modes, and college-level reading and writing techniques. Multimedia content to express other forms of exposition and ideas in contemporary society. Group and individual projects to provide student-centered analysis of text and construction of meaning.
13. ASSIGNMENTS: 0.00 hours/week (List all assignments, including library assignments. Requires two (2) hours of independent work outside of class for each unit/weekly lecture hour. Outside assignments are not required for lab-only courses, although they can be given.)

Out-of-class Assignments:
Composition of at least 8,000 words of prose in this course, of which 3000 words may be revisions. 5 essays of 800-1000 words or more. Research paper of 1500-2000 words. Reading of 8-10 longer essays and a number of shorter essays for comprehension, analysis, summaries, and/or written response. Read and write in response to a book-length work of fiction or non-fiction in addition to class reader and assigned handbook. Sentence combining and grammar exercises.


ASSIGNMENTS ARE: (See definition of college level):
Primarily College Level
14. STUDENT ASSESSMENT: (Grades are based on):
ESSAY (Includes "blue book" exams and any written assignment of sufficient length and complexity to require students to select and organize ideas, to explain and support the ideas, and to demonstrate critical thinking skills.)
NON-COMPUTATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVING (Critical thinking should be demonstrated by solving unfamiliar problems via various strategies.)
SKILL DEMONSTRATION
MULTIPLE CHOICE
OTHER (Describe):
Evaluation of essays, including short essays, the research paper, mid-term and final exams (when assigned), and in-class quizzes (when assigned) for understanding of course material. Evaluation of written assignments for coherence, evidence of critical thinking and analysis, individual effort, accurate documentation of ideas. Evaluation of quizzes for understanding of material presented. Evaluation of ability to demonstrate the use of skills taught in multiple modes throughout the term.
15. TEXTS, READINGS, AND MATERIALS
  A. Textbooks:
 
  • Raimes. Pocket Keys for Writers. update Houghton Mifflin, 2009.
  • Rosa. Models for Writers, Ninth Edition. St. Martin’s Press, 2007.
  • Bartholomae. Ways of Reading, 9th edition. 9 Bedford/St. Martins, 2010.
    Rationale: Most recent edition available
  • Colombo et al. Rereading America, 9th edition. 9 Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2013.
    Rationale: -
  • Hacker. Rules for Writers, Sixth Edition. Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2007.
 
  • Full-length works at discretion of instructor
 

*Date is required: Transfer institutions require current publication date(s) within 5 years of outline addition/update.

  B. Additional Resources:
 
  • Library/LRC Materials and Services:

    The instructor, in consultation with a librarian, has reviewed the materials and services of the College Library/LRC in the subject areas related to the proposed new course
  • Are print materials adequate?     Yes
  • Are nonprint materials adequate?     No
  • Are electronic/online resources available?     Yes
  • Are services adequate?     Yes
  • Specific materials and/or services needed have been identified and discussed. Librarian comments:
  C. Readings listed in A and B above are: (See definition of college level):
 

Primarily college level

16. DESIGNATE OCCUPATIONAL CODE:
E - Non-Occupational
17. LEVEL BELOW TRANSFER:
Y - Not Applicable
18. CALIFORNIA CLASSIFICATION CODE:
Y - Credit Course
19. NON CREDIT COURSE CATEGORY:
Y - Not Applicable
20. FUNDING AGENCY CATEGORY:
Not Applicable - Not Applicable
SUPPLEMENTAL PAGE

Use only if additional space is needed. (Type the item number which is to be continued, followed by "continued." Show the page number in the blank at the bottom of the page. If the item being continued is on page 2 of the outline, the first supplemental page will be "2a." If additional supplemental pages are required for page 2, they are to be numbered as 2b, 2c, etc.)

1a. Prerequisites/Corequisites/Recommended Preparation:
    PREREQUISITE:
  • ENGL 201B: Preparation for Composition and Reading Preparation for Composition and Reading
  • PREREQUISITE:
  • ESL 052B: Advanced Reading and Writing
  • PREREQUISITE:
  • ESL 021B: Writing 6 (Composition / Reading) Writing 6(Composition/Reading
  • PREREQUISITE:
  • Appropriate placement through multiple measures assessment process
  • PREREQUISITE:
  • ENGL 264B: Preparation for Composition, Reading, and Research
    or