COLLEGE OF ALAMEDA COURSE OUTLINE

COLLEGE: STATE APPROVAL DATE:
ORIGINATOR: Jayne Smithson STATE CONTROL NUMBER:
BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVAL DATE:
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE APPROVAL DATE: 10/17/2017
CURRENT EFFECTIVE DATE:
 
DIVISION/DEPARTMENT:

1. REQUESTED CREDIT CLASSIFICATION:
  Credit - Degree Applicable
Course is not a basic skills course.
Program Applicable
2. DEPT/COURSE NO: 3. COURSE TITLE:
  ANTHR 001   Introduction to Physical Anthropology
4. COURSE: COA Course Changes only in Non-Catalog Info   TOP NO. 2202.00
5. UNITS: 3.000   HRS/WK LEC: 3.00 Total: 52.50
  HRS/WK LAB:

6. NO. OF TIMES OFFERED AS SELETED TOPIC:       AVERAGE ENROLLMENT:
7. JUSTIFICATION FOR COURSE:
  Biological anthropology is one of the core components of anthropology.
8. COURSE/CATALOG DESCRIPTION
  Study of human beings and their ancestors: Emphasis on relationships to other mammals, physical record of evolution and processes responsible for evolution.
9. OTHER CATALOG INFORMATION
 
  1. Modular: No     If yes, how many modules:
  2. Open entry/open exit: No
  3. Grading Policy: Both Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
  4. Eligible for credit by Exam: No
  5. Repeatable according to state guidelines: No
  6. Required for degree/certificate (specify):
    New - AA-T in Anthropology
  7. Meets GE/Transfer requirements (specify):
    Acceptable for credit: UC/CSU. AA/AS area 1. CSU area B2. IGETC area 5B.
  8. C-ID Number: ANTH 110 Expiration Date:

  9. Are there prerequisites/corequisites/recommended preparation for this course? Yes
  10. Acceptable for Credit: CSU/UC
10. LIST STUDENT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (EXIT SKILLS): (Objectives must define the exit skills required of students and include criteria identified in Items 12, 14, and 15 - critical thinking, essay writing, problem solving, written/verbal communications, computational skills, working with others, workplace needs, SCANS competencies, all aspects of the industry, etc.)(See SCANS/All Aspects of Industry Worksheet.)

Students will be able to:
  1. Describe the scientific process as a methodology for understanding the natural world.
  2. Discuss the role of biological anthropology within the discipline and identify the main contributors to the development of evolutionary theory.
  3. Explain the basic principles of Mendelian, molecular and population genetics.
  4. Evaluate how the forces of evolution produce genetic and phenotypic change over time.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of classification, morphology and behavior of living primates.
  6. Summarize methods used in interpreting the fossil record, including dating techniques.
  7. Recognize the major groups of hominin fossils and describe alternate phylogenies for human evolution.
  8. Identify the biological and cultural factors responsible for human variation.
11A. COURSE CONTENT: List major topics to be covered. This section must be more than listing chapter headings from a textbook. Outline the course content, including essential topics, major subdivisions, and supporting details. It should include enough information so that a faculty member from any institution will have a clear understanding of the material taught in the course and the approximate length of time devoted to each. There should be congruence among the catalog description, lecture and/or lab content, student performance objectives, and the student learning outcomes. List percent of time spent on each topic; ensure percentages total 100%.

LECTURE CONTENT:

1.  Nature of scientific inquiry and the scientific method  5%

2.  Anthropological perspective  5%

3.  History and development of biological evolutionary thought  5%

4.  Molecular, Mendelian and population genetics  15%

5.  Mechanisms of evolution  10%

6.  Comparative primate taxonomy, anatomy and behavior  15%

7.  The nature of the fossil record including dating techniques  10%

8.  Fossil and genetic evidence of human evolution  20%

9.  Biocultural adaptations and modern human variation  15%   

11B. LAB CONTENT:
N/A
12. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION (List methods used to present course content.)
  1. Distance Education
  2. Field Trips
  3. Lecture
  4. Discussion
  5. Other (Specify)
  6. Observation and Demonstration

  7. Other Methods:
    1. In-class exercises in analysis and interpretation of fossils and genetic evidence. 2. Discussion of anthropological perspective and methodology. 3. Lecture on biocultural adaptations and modern human variation. 4. Visit to museum and guest lectures for perspective and recent discoveries.
13. ASSIGNMENTS: 6.00 hours/week (List all assignments, including library assignments. Requires two (2) hours of independent work outside of class for each unit/weekly lecture hour. Outside assignments are not required for lab-only courses, although they can be given.)

Out-of-class Assignments:
1. Research paper on mechanisms of evolution. 2. Group and individual projects on comparative primate taxonomy, anatomy and behavior. 3. Written projects throughout the semester on the nature of scientific inquiry and the scientific method.


ASSIGNMENTS ARE: (See definition of college level):
Primarily College Level
14. STUDENT ASSESSMENT: (Grades are based on):
ESSAY (Includes "blue book" exams and any written assignment of sufficient length and complexity to require students to select and organize ideas, to explain and support the ideas, and to demonstrate critical thinking skills.)
MULTIPLE CHOICE
NON-COMPUTATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVING (Critical thinking should be demonstrated by solving unfamiliar problems via various strategies.)
COMPUTATION SKILLS
OTHER (Describe):
1. Objective tests on computation of dates for fossils and early hominin tools. 2. Discussion of evolution as evidenced by genetic investigation. 3. Presentation demonstrating understanding of comparative anatomy and non-human primates. 4. Essay responses on understanding of modern human variation.
15. TEXTS, READINGS, AND MATERIALS
  A. Textbooks:
 
  • Jurmain, R. Kilgore, L., Trevathan, W.. 2017. Essentials of Physical Anthropolgy 7. Wadsworth/Cengage
    Rationale: -
  • Larsen, C.S.. 2017. Our Origins: Discovering Physical Anthropology 4. W.W. Norton
  • Stanford, C., Allen, J. and Anton, S.. 2017. Exploring Biological Anthropology 4. Pearson
 

*Date is required: Transfer institutions require current publication date(s) within 5 years of outline addition/update.

  B. Additional Resources:
 
  • Library/LRC Materials and Services:

    The instructor, in consultation with a librarian, has reviewed the materials and services of the College Library/LRC in the subject areas related to the proposed new course
  • Are print materials adequate?     Yes
  • Are nonprint materials adequate?     Yes
  • Are electronic/online resources available?     Yes
  • Are services adequate?     Yes
  • Specific materials and/or services needed have been identified and discussed. Librarian comments:
    Please provide a list of recent, recommended supplementary (non-textbook) titles to a COA librarian.
  C. Readings listed in A and B above are: (See definition of college level):
 

Primarily college level

16. DESIGNATE OCCUPATIONAL CODE:
E - Non-Occupational
17. LEVEL BELOW TRANSFER:
Y - Not Applicable
18. CALIFORNIA CLASSIFICATION CODE:
19. NON CREDIT COURSE CATEGORY:
Y - Not Applicable
20. FUNDING AGENCY CATEGORY:
Not Applicable - Not Applicable
SUPPLEMENTAL PAGE

Use only if additional space is needed. (Type the item number which is to be continued, followed by "continued." Show the page number in the blank at the bottom of the page. If the item being continued is on page 2 of the outline, the first supplemental page will be "2a." If additional supplemental pages are required for page 2, they are to be numbered as 2b, 2c, etc.)

1a. Prerequisites/Corequisites/Recommended Preparation:
    RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:
  • ENGL 001A: Composition and Reading