COLLEGE OF ALAMEDA COURSE OUTLINE

COLLEGE: STATE APPROVAL DATE: 09/27/2010
ORIGINATOR: Vanson Nguyen STATE CONTROL NUMBER: CCC000376233
BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVAL DATE: 05/08/2008
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE APPROVAL DATE: 03/17/2015
CURRENT EFFECTIVE DATE:
 
DIVISION/DEPARTMENT:

1. REQUESTED CREDIT CLASSIFICATION:
  Credit - Degree Applicable
Course is not a basic skills course.
Program Applicable
2. DEPT/COURSE NO: 3. COURSE TITLE:
  MATH 013   Introduction to Statistics
4. COURSE: COA Course Changes only in Non-Catalog Info   TOP NO. 1701.00
5. UNITS: 4.000   HRS/WK LEC: 4.00 Total: 70.00
  HRS/WK LAB:

6. NO. OF TIMES OFFERED AS SELETED TOPIC:       AVERAGE ENROLLMENT:
7. JUSTIFICATION FOR COURSE:
  Satisfies the general Education Analytical Thinking requirement for Associate Degrees. Partially satisfies mathematics requirement for the Associate in Arts degree with a major in mathematics. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning Component required for transfer to UC,CSU, and some independent four-year colleges. Acceptable for credit: UC ,CSU
8. COURSE/CATALOG DESCRIPTION
  Introduction to theory and practice of statistics: Collecting data: Sampling, observational and experimental studies. Organizing data: Univariate and bivariate tables and graphs, histograms. Describing data: Measures of location, spread, and correlation. Theory: Probability, random variables; binomial and normal distributions. Drawing conclusions from data: Confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, z-tests, t-tests, and chi-square tests; one-way analysis of variance. Regression and non-parametric methods.
9. OTHER CATALOG INFORMATION
 
  1. Modular: No     If yes, how many modules:
  2. Open entry/open exit: No
  3. Grading Policy: Letter Grade Only
  4. Eligible for credit by Exam: No
  5. Repeatable according to state guidelines: No
  6. Required for degree/certificate (specify):
    Existing
  7. Meets GE/Transfer requirements (specify):
    AA/AS area 4b, 4e; CSU-GE area B4; IGETC area 2
  8. C-ID Number: MATH 110 Expiration Date:

  9. Are there prerequisites/corequisites/recommended preparation for this course? Yes
    Date of last prereq/coreq validation: 03/17/2015
10. LIST STUDENT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (EXIT SKILLS): (Objectives must define the exit skills required of students and include criteria identified in Items 12, 14, and 15 - critical thinking, essay writing, problem solving, written/verbal communications, computational skills, working with others, workplace needs, SCANS competencies, all aspects of the industry, etc.)(See SCANS/All Aspects of Industry Worksheet.)

Students will be able to:
  1. Distinguish among different scales of measurement and their implications;
  2. Interpret data displayed in tables and graphically;
  3. Apply concepts of sample space and probability;
  4. Calculate measures of central tendency and variation for a given data set;
  5. Identify the standard methods of obtaining data and identify advantages and disadvantages
  6. Calculate the mean and variance of a discrete distribution;
  7. Calculate probabilities using normal and student’s t-distributions;
  8. Distinguish the difference between sample and population distributions and analyze the role played by the Central Limit Theorem;
  9. Construct and interpret confidence intervals;
  10. Determine and interpret levels of statistical significance including p-values;
  11. Interpret the output of a technology-based statistical analysis;
  12. Identify the basic concept of hypothesis testing including Type I and II errors;
  13. Formulate hypothesis tests involving samples from one and two populations;
  14. Select the appropriate technique for testing a hypothesis and interpret the result;
  15. Use linear regression and ANOVA analysis for estimation and inference, and interpret the associated statistics; and
  16. Use appropriate statistical techniques to analyze and interpret applications based on data from disciplines including business, social sciences, psychology, life science, health science, and education
11A. COURSE CONTENT: List major topics to be covered. This section must be more than listing chapter headings from a textbook. Outline the course content, including essential topics, major subdivisions, and supporting details. It should include enough information so that a faculty member from any institution will have a clear understanding of the material taught in the course and the approximate length of time devoted to each. There should be congruence among the catalog description, lecture and/or lab content, student performance objectives, and the student learning outcomes. List percent of time spent on each topic; ensure percentages total 100%.

LECTURE CONTENT:

LECTURE CONTENT:
1. Introduction to statistical thinking (10%)
      a. Terminology
      b. Sampling
      c. Public opinion polls
      d. Introduction to confidence intervals

2. Organizing data (10%)
      a. Univariate numerical data
      b. Other univariate data
      c. Bivariate data
      d. Summarizing data graphically and numerically
      e. Sample spaces

3. Describing data (10%)
      a. Measures of location
      b. Measures of spread
      c. Standard deviations and percentage distribution of data
      d. Grouped data

4. Probability (10%)
      a. Introduction
      b. Compound events and probability laws
      c. Random variables

5. The binomial distribution (5%)
      a. Binomial probabilities
      b. Applications

6. The normal distribution (10%)
      a. Normal distributions
      b. The standard normal distribution
      c. Applications
      d. Central limit theorem
      e. The normal approximation to the binomial

7. Sampling distributions (5%)
      a. Sampling distribution of the sample proportion
      b. Sampling distribution of the sample mean

8. Confidence intervals (10%)
      a. Sample mean; large sample size
      b. Sample mean; small sample size
      c. Sample proportion

9. Hypothesis testing (10%)
      a. The concept
      b. One proportion
      c. Experiments (including t-tests for one population)
      d. Two means (including t-tests for two populations)
      e. Two proportions

10. Chi-square tests (5%)
      a. Independence
      b. Goodness-of-Fit
      c. Homogeneity
      d. Hypothosis testing for variance

11. Analysis of variance (5%)
      a. The context
      b. One-way ANOVA

12. Correlation and regression (5%)
      a. Correlation coefficient
      b. The SD line and regression line
      c. The regression concept
      d. Inference concerning correlation and regression

13. Technology: Graphing calculators and/or appropriate computer software will be integrated into the course throughout the semester. (5%)

 

 

11B. LAB CONTENT:
n/a
12. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION (List methods used to present course content.)
  1. Discussion
  2. Distance Education
  3. Lecture
  4. Multimedia Content
  5. Other (Specify)

  6. Other Methods:
    Instructor led lecture introducing the major concepts, theory, and applications in the language of statistics and analysis. Interactive class discussions on worksheets, including question and answer sections reviewing case studies as presented in text books and lecture. Written homework to distinguish between specifics in questions, and application of multiple tables and formulas to ensure individual understanding. Quizzes to test knowledge of immediate concepts and gauge understanding through outcome. Chapter tests measure build-up of understanding and allows students a plan of study moving into the final. Graphing calculators and/or appropriate computer software will be integrated into the course throughout the semester.
13. ASSIGNMENTS: 0.00 hours/week (List all assignments, including library assignments. Requires two (2) hours of independent work outside of class for each unit/weekly lecture hour. Outside assignments are not required for lab-only courses, although they can be given.)

Out-of-class Assignments:
Out-of-class Assignments: College-level textbook chapter readings that reinforce lecture material. Problem sets including computational problems equivalent in content and level of difficulty to those covered in the lectures. Additional problems that introduce supplemental concepts and formulas and require the synthesis and analysis of various concepts. Graphical representation and analysis specific to the study of statistics. Use of graphing calculators or software to compute statistics and probabilities appropriate for course content.


ASSIGNMENTS ARE: (See definition of college level):
Primarily College Level
14. STUDENT ASSESSMENT: (Grades are based on):
ESSAY (Includes "blue book" exams and any written assignment of sufficient length and complexity to require students to select and organize ideas, to explain and support the ideas, and to demonstrate critical thinking skills.)
COMPUTATION SKILLS
NON-COMPUTATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVING (Critical thinking should be demonstrated by solving unfamiliar problems via various strategies.)
OTHER (Describe):
Assess essay for understanding and application of concepts presented in classwork and supplemental material. Evaluate computation skills for accurate application of steps and correct answers. Evaluate students' ability to analyze given information and apply it in terms of the question.
15. TEXTS, READINGS, AND MATERIALS
  A. Textbooks:
 
  • Larson & Farber. 2014. Elementary Statistics 6th. Pearson
 
  • Graphing Calculator or Statistics Software (N/A) [Software]. N/A. Technology to calculate probabilities and/or statistics: graphing calculator, EXCEL or other software that is current and approved by the department.
 

*Date is required: Transfer institutions require current publication date(s) within 5 years of outline addition/update.

  B. Additional Resources:
 
  • Library/LRC Materials and Services:

    The instructor, in consultation with a librarian, has reviewed the materials and services of the College Library/LRC in the subject areas related to the proposed new course
  • Are print materials adequate?     Yes
  • Are nonprint materials adequate?     No
  • Are electronic/online resources available?     Yes
  • Are services adequate?     Yes
  • Specific materials and/or services needed have been identified and discussed. Librarian comments:
    Instructors to donate additional statistics books.
  C. Readings listed in A and B above are: (See definition of college level):
 

Primarily college level

16. DESIGNATE OCCUPATIONAL CODE:
E - Non-Occupational
17. LEVEL BELOW TRANSFER:
Y - Not Applicable
18. CALIFORNIA CLASSIFICATION CODE:
Y - Credit Course
19. NON CREDIT COURSE CATEGORY:
Y - Not Applicable
20. FUNDING AGENCY CATEGORY:
Not Applicable - Not Applicable
SUPPLEMENTAL PAGE

Use only if additional space is needed. (Type the item number which is to be continued, followed by "continued." Show the page number in the blank at the bottom of the page. If the item being continued is on page 2 of the outline, the first supplemental page will be "2a." If additional supplemental pages are required for page 2, they are to be numbered as 2b, 2c, etc.)

1a. Prerequisites/Corequisites/Recommended Preparation:
    PREREQUISITE:
  • MATH 203: Intermediate Algebra
    or
  • PREREQUISITE:
  • MATH 206: Algebra for Statistics