COLLEGE OF ALAMEDA COURSE OUTLINE

COLLEGE: STATE APPROVAL DATE: 09/27/2010
ORIGINATOR: Patricia Nelson STATE CONTROL NUMBER: CCC000373100
BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVAL DATE: 06/03/2014
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE APPROVAL DATE: 04/15/2013
CURRENT EFFECTIVE DATE:
 
DIVISION/DEPARTMENT:

1. REQUESTED CREDIT CLASSIFICATION:
  Credit - Degree Applicable
Course is not a basic skills course.
Program Applicable
2. DEPT/COURSE NO: 3. COURSE TITLE:
  ENGL 001B   Composition and Reading
4. COURSE: COA Course Changes only in Non-Catalog Info   TOP NO. 1501.00
5. UNITS: 4.000   HRS/WK LEC: 4.00 Total: 70.00
  HRS/WK LAB:

6. NO. OF TIMES OFFERED AS SELETED TOPIC:       AVERAGE ENROLLMENT:
7. JUSTIFICATION FOR COURSE:
  Satisfies General Education requirement. Transferable to CSU and UC.
8. COURSE/CATALOG DESCRIPTION
  Continued expository writing based on careful reading of selected plays, poems, and novels.
9. OTHER CATALOG INFORMATION
 
  1. Modular: No     If yes, how many modules:
  2. Open entry/open exit: No
  3. Grading Policy: Both Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
  4. Eligible for credit by Exam: No
  5. Repeatable according to state guidelines: No
  6. Required for degree/certificate (specify):
    New - AA-T in English
  7. Meets GE/Transfer requirements (specify):
    G. E.
  8. C-ID Number: Expiration Date:

  9. Are there prerequisites/corequisites/recommended preparation for this course? Yes
  10. Acceptable for Credit: CSU/UC
10. LIST STUDENT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (EXIT SKILLS): (Objectives must define the exit skills required of students and include criteria identified in Items 12, 14, and 15 - critical thinking, essay writing, problem solving, written/verbal communications, computational skills, working with others, workplace needs, SCANS competencies, all aspects of the industry, etc.)(See SCANS/All Aspects of Industry Worksheet.)

Students will be able to:
  1. Compose formal, analytical, and interpretive essays using common literary terms applied to specific texts using appropriate academic language and conventions of literary analysis;
  2. Examine and apply the writing process, as in the writing of informal responses to many of the texts they read, in order to help them explore ideas they encounter in written texts and to discover new concepts of their own;
  3. Analyze, understand, and better appreciate the subtlety of thought and expression of feeling in literature;
  4. Categorize and show familiarity with the basic principles and distinction among the various literary genres: Fiction, literary essays, poetry, and drama.
  5. Practice interactive, comparative reading of texts and to integrate contextual material such as the author’s background, cultural and historical environment of the work into their understanding of the readings;
  6. Formulate and develop an argumentative or evaluative thesis, paraphrase literary works, integrate quotation and summary for effective support of arguments and interpretations;
  7. Apply the fundamentals of library research and research writing in response to literature, such as the location and use of specialized reference materials, use of computer data bases to find information on current authors, structure, support, and documentation in the research essay in response to literature.
11A. COURSE CONTENT: List major topics to be covered. This section must be more than listing chapter headings from a textbook. Outline the course content, including essential topics, major subdivisions, and supporting details. It should include enough information so that a faculty member from any institution will have a clear understanding of the material taught in the course and the approximate length of time devoted to each. There should be congruence among the catalog description, lecture and/or lab content, student performance objectives, and the student learning outcomes. List percent of time spent on each topic; ensure percentages total 100%.

LECTURE CONTENT:

1.    Review of the writing process and writing the interpretive/analytical essay in response to literary works, including literary terminology, devices and critical approaches;
2.    Overview of literature, emphasizing how ideas and critical thoughts about both personal social reality are embodied in fictional texts; comparisons between genres of fiction and nonfiction as methods of communication and thought;
3.    Explanation of the comparative method in response to literature, making observations and writing comparative essays about connections between literature and life experiences, between different forms of literature, between fiction and nonfiction, between works from different cultures, between works by the same author;
4.    Introduction to reading responding, orally and in writing, to the literary essay;
5.    Critical reading and responding, orally and in writing to short stories;
6.    Critical reading and responding, orally and in writing, to poetry;
7.    Critical reading and responding, orally and in writing, to dramatic works;
8.    Critical reading and responding to book-length fiction or creative non-fiction;
9.    Introduction to literary research methods; practice in writing the literary research paper.

11B. LAB CONTENT:
N/A
12. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION (List methods used to present course content.)
  1. Other (Specify)
  2. Distance Education
  3. Lecture

  4. Other Methods:
    Instructor-led lecture on literary genre, period, and artist. Peer sharing and collaborative learning to reinforce analysis, evaluation, interpretation, and cultural reflection. Student presentations to deepen individual expressive abilities. Multi-media presentations to enhance the effects of literature under study and to increase the avenues for understanding literary expression.
13. ASSIGNMENTS: 0.00 hours/week (List all assignments, including library assignments. Requires two (2) hours of independent work outside of class for each unit/weekly lecture hour. Outside assignments are not required for lab-only courses, although they can be given.)

Out-of-class Assignments:
- Essays: At least 8000 words of substantial essay writing comparing works, authors, theories or genres. - Preparation of oral presentations and reports showing familiarity with the texts and authors under study. - Assigned readings of literary texts - Research paper of no less than 1400 words, including a minimum of five sources.


ASSIGNMENTS ARE: (See definition of college level):
Primarily College Level
14. STUDENT ASSESSMENT: (Grades are based on):
SKILL DEMONSTRATION
ESSAY (Includes "blue book" exams and any written assignment of sufficient length and complexity to require students to select and organize ideas, to explain and support the ideas, and to demonstrate critical thinking skills.)
NON-COMPUTATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVING (Critical thinking should be demonstrated by solving unfamiliar problems via various strategies.)
OTHER (Describe):
Evaluate essays for formality, analytical quality, and application of the writing process. Assess student's ability to uniquely resolve literary quandries based on genre, period, or cultural analysis. Determine student's ability to accurately categorize genres, apply library research techniques (including documenting sources in current MLA format), and quote and paraphrase from literature.
15. TEXTS, READINGS, AND MATERIALS
  A. Textbooks:
 
  • Achebe. Things Fall Apart. Bantam Double Day, 1959.
    Rationale: -Novel
  • Al-Shaykh. Women of Sand & Myrrh. 1992 Anchor Books, 1992.
    Rationale: This is a novel.
  • Raimes. Keys for Writers. update Houghton/Mifflin Co, 2009.
    Rationale: -
  • Said. Ali & Nino: Love Story. Bantam Double Day, 2000.
    Rationale: -
  • Wilson, August. Ma Rainey's Black Bottom: A Play. Plume, 1985.
    Rationale: Most recent edition.
 

*Date is required: Transfer institutions require current publication date(s) within 5 years of outline addition/update.

  B. Additional Resources:
 
  • Library/LRC Materials and Services:

    The instructor, in consultation with a librarian, has reviewed the materials and services of the College Library/LRC in the subject areas related to the proposed new course
  • Are print materials adequate?     Yes
  • Are nonprint materials adequate?     No
  • Are electronic/online resources available?     Yes
  • Are services adequate?     Yes
  • Specific materials and/or services needed have been identified and discussed. Librarian comments:
  C. Readings listed in A and B above are: (See definition of college level):
 

Primarily college level

16. DESIGNATE OCCUPATIONAL CODE:
E - Non-Occupational
17. LEVEL BELOW TRANSFER:
Y - Not Applicable
18. CALIFORNIA CLASSIFICATION CODE:
Y - Credit Course
19. NON CREDIT COURSE CATEGORY:
Y - Not Applicable
20. FUNDING AGENCY CATEGORY:
Not Applicable - Not Applicable
SUPPLEMENTAL PAGE

Use only if additional space is needed. (Type the item number which is to be continued, followed by "continued." Show the page number in the blank at the bottom of the page. If the item being continued is on page 2 of the outline, the first supplemental page will be "2a." If additional supplemental pages are required for page 2, they are to be numbered as 2b, 2c, etc.)

1a. Prerequisites/Corequisites/Recommended Preparation:
    PREREQUISITE:
  • ENGL 001A: Composition and Reading Composition and Reading