COLLEGE OF ALAMEDA COURSE OUTLINE

COLLEGE: STATE APPROVAL DATE: 09/27/2010
ORIGINATOR: Robert Brem STATE CONTROL NUMBER: CCC000347383
BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVAL DATE: 05/08/2008
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE APPROVAL DATE: 05/01/2012
CURRENT EFFECTIVE DATE:
 
DIVISION/DEPARTMENT:

1. REQUESTED CREDIT CLASSIFICATION:
  Credit - Degree Applicable
Course is not a basic skills course.
Program Applicable
2. DEPT/COURSE NO: 3. COURSE TITLE:
  POSCI 001   Government and Politics in the United States
4. COURSE: COA Course Changes only in Non-Catalog Info   TOP NO. 2207.00
5. UNITS: 3.000   HRS/WK LEC: 3.00 Total: 52.50
  HRS/WK LAB:

6. NO. OF TIMES OFFERED AS SELETED TOPIC:       AVERAGE ENROLLMENT:
7. JUSTIFICATION FOR COURSE:
  Government and Politics in the United States is required for political science majors; meets the American History and Institutions requirement; fulfills CSU-GE, UC-GE and IGETC; and prepares students for effective citizenship..
8. COURSE/CATALOG DESCRIPTION
  Introduction to principles and the political process of national, state, and local government: Emphasis on national government and the Constitution.
9. OTHER CATALOG INFORMATION
 
  1. Modular: No     If yes, how many modules:
  2. Open entry/open exit: No
  3. Grading Policy: Both Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
  4. Eligible for credit by Exam: No
  5. Repeatable according to state guidelines: No
  6. Required for degree/certificate (specify):
    Existing - A.A. in Political Science at College of Alameda
  7. Meets GE/Transfer requirements (specify):
    CSU-GE, UC and IGETC; American Institutions Requirement
  8. C-ID Number: Expiration Date:

  9. Are there prerequisites/corequisites/recommended preparation for this course? No
10. LIST STUDENT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (EXIT SKILLS): (Objectives must define the exit skills required of students and include criteria identified in Items 12, 14, and 15 - critical thinking, essay writing, problem solving, written/verbal communications, computational skills, working with others, workplace needs, SCANS competencies, all aspects of the industry, etc.)(See SCANS/All Aspects of Industry Worksheet.)

Students will be able to:
    A] Knowledge Mastery Index One: Demonstrate a degree of mastery and working knowledge of the historical background, governing principles, and institutions of the national government of the United States of America.
  1. A] Knowledge Mastery Index One: Demonstrate a degree of mastery and working knowledge of the historical background, governing principles, and institutions of the national government of the United States of America.
  2. Define various concepts and terms from the discipline of political science, theory, and the historical evolution of American political philosophy and describe how these are relevant in understanding American governance in the 21st century.
  3. Differentiate between: a) social order & forms of government, b) governance and government, c) democratic society and a republican form of government; and Describe how these relate to American society in the 21st century.
  4. State the causes of the American War for Independence
  5. List the main weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation
  6. Identify three major thinkers who shaped the ideas at the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention, and state briefly their main concepts or theories
  7. Identify the four major compromises agreed to by the participants at the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention
  8. Explain the dynamics of the U.S. Constitution and the "Idea of America" as the actual "American Revolution."
  9. Explain the three major components of the American Revolution: separation of powers, judicial review, and checks & balances.
  10. Explain the notion of checks & balances: a) within government, b) between national, state, and local governments, and c) between the sectors of society (public sector, private sector, and social sector); and Describe how these dynamics result in the character or current state of democracy in America.
  11. Explain the major institutions of government in the American Republic (branches of government, departments, functions & roles of various political positions); and Demonstrate how this manifests in the policy making process.
  12. Explain "Iron Triangle/Policy Networks" and trace the steps involved in law & policy making in the U.S. system of governance.
    B] Critical Political Thinking Proficiency Index Two: Demonstrate a degree of proficiency in being able to use political thinking, analysis (theory and philosophy), and “futures consciousness” as these pertain to American Governance in the 21st Century – in the process of learning about the government of the United States; and one will also be able to articulate how these concepts and skills are applied in American public service – and be able to articulate how pursue that as a career path (if this is of interest).
  1. B] Critical Political Thinking Proficiency Index Two: Demonstrate a degree of proficiency in being able to use political thinking, analysis (theory and philosophy), and “futures consciousness” as these pertain to American Governance in the 21st Century – in the process of learning about the government of the United States; and one will also be able to articulate how these concepts and skills are applied in American public service – and be able to articulate how pursue that as a career path (if this is of interest).
  2. Synthesize classical world views (conservative liberal, and radical) and apply to socially significant problematiques.
  3. Distinguish the central values tendencies of each of the Classical World Views (conservative, liberal, and radical) and differentiate these from their modern variants (right and left) as manifested in political parties, interest groups, and political agency.
  4. Differentiate and Compare actual consequences of the policy making process in actual practice in terms of: what it is designed to do, what it might do, and what it can't do.
  5. Arrange key concepts of the "American social contract" distinguishing these in three sectors: public, private, and social.
  6. Distinguish and relate how the American social contract was designed to work, how it does work, and how it could work as applied in creating a more "functional" 21st Century social order.
    C] Socio-Political Personal Efficacy Index Three: Demonstrate a degree of capacity to assume responsibility – personal efficacy - consistent with democratic republican values - in application of the socio-political concepts explored in this class in a meaningful manner to one's own reality as a citizen, worker, and person (a) as part of everyday life as engaged citizens in a modern; and (b) as one has to deal with the consequences of the global environmental (and other) challenges all persons must face in the 21st Century.
  1. C] Socio-Political Personal Efficacy Index Three: Demonstrate a degree of capacity to assume responsibility – personal efficacy - consistent with democratic republican values - in application of the socio-political concepts explored in this class in a meaningful manner to one's own reality as a citizen, worker, and person (a) as part of everyday life as engaged citizens in a modern; and (b) as one has to deal with the consequences of the global environmental (and other) challenges all persons must face in the 21st Century.
  2. Explain how the policy process impacts one's life directly and how citizens can be involved in shaping their society – citizen engagement.
  3. Identify concrete examples of specific concepts and explain how these result in a synthesis in the actual practice.
  4. Interpret how the central values tendencies of each of the Classical World Views (conservative, liberal, and radical) shape one's own behavior patterns as these shape application in manifesting one's life as a citizen, worker, or person as community change agents in the 21st Century.
  5. Explore different theories and explain different approaches toward healing and revitalizing communities that are affected by violence
  6. Describe the various change agent strategies to build healthy communities
  7. Construct a level of political consciousness around building a peace centered life, workplace, and social order in personal engagement with and building community
  8. Define and explain effective citizenship in terms of “classical republican virtue” as applied in one's own life.
11A. COURSE CONTENT: List major topics to be covered. This section must be more than listing chapter headings from a textbook. Outline the course content, including essential topics, major subdivisions, and supporting details. It should include enough information so that a faculty member from any institution will have a clear understanding of the material taught in the course and the approximate length of time devoted to each. There should be congruence among the catalog description, lecture and/or lab content, student performance objectives, and the student learning outcomes. List percent of time spent on each topic; ensure percentages total 100%.

LECTURE CONTENT:

I  Problem Framing:                                        5%

Definition of this time in “the human story” (i.e. history) as important and exciting with issues of import at stake; perhaps bigger than at any other time in the story of the human species. The speed and effects of technological change combined with reach of the global economy present us with important opportunities and grave dangers (see the theory of the "Red Queen Hypothesis" as applied in politics); threats of totalitarianism [Orwell, 1984]. 

How the social system outlined & implied in the concept of "The Idea of America" (c.f. Tom Paine) was designed to work, how it does work in practice, and how it might work in the context of civic engagement in the 21st Century. 

II FOUNDATIONS OF AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT AND PRACTICE      (35%)

Introductory level review of the “discipline” of politics and critical political thinking:


Public Law and the citizen in day-to-day life (all politics is personal) -- what the concept of "politics" mean to ordinary people; justifications for government – a social contract conceptualization of “governance” and social order and world views (liberal / liberty, conservative / order, and radical / equality) in "the context of democratic values" and democratic community building.

An introduction to Constitutional Government in America -- The American Social Contract:


The “Real American Revolution” – the rule of law versus populism.  “Being a democratic republic” -- understanding the "Republic” versus “Democracy” Debate – democratic social order and republican form of government; Articles; amendments; Federalism; Separation of powers – moving from “United States” to “The United States;” Governance and government in the context of a Checks & Balances Society (public sector (public goods) in balance with the private sector or market (private goods) and the social sector or private life (social goods)).

The place of national, state, and local government in the context of Federalism:


Federal funding issues relative to the states (Case studies involving California and other states and the national government); Societal sectors, intergovernmental relations, and “Iron Triangles” & "policy networks" in policy making. 

Human Rights in tension with Property Rights:  civil rights & liberties and human rights; the 9th and 14th Amendments; "Civil Society,” National Civic League;  “The Rights Revolution” and the New Federalist Backlash: who will we be?

Demands & Supports and republican virtue; Public Participation, public opinion and Truman’s “objective partisanship,” private affairs to public issues; voting  &  elections & political Parties – national and state and local.  (California case studies).

III INTRODUCTION TO THE INSTITUTIONS OF THE PRACTICE OF AMERICAN POLITICS  (35%)

The “potential Intelligence of democracy”  --  Representing the people via shared attitude groups in policy debates.
Public opinion, Interest Groups, & Lobbying (the myth of “special interests” – everyone has a special interest….);
 Movement Politics & Identity politics; citizen politics and participation – Pluralism and citizens translating political goals
 into governmental action.  (California case studies).

Making the Law  -- Representing the people and the states -- The Legislative Branch -- The U.S. Congress; comparisons to the California legislature.

Enforcing the Law  --  Representing the nation -- The Executive Branch – The American Presidency.
The Bureaucracy – public administration and the public service: regulations and balancing & protecting the public interest in the face of private interests; intergovernmental relations (federal, state, and local -- California case studies).

Interpreting the Law:  Representing the Constitution -- The Judicial Branch – federal, state, and local; (the myth of activist judges – liberal, conservative, and radical perspectives in interpreting the Constitution). (California case studies)

Governance and Democracy in America:  institutions and actors and world views (conservative, liberal, and radical) in the public, private, and social sectors operating together as an integrated whole.


IV COURSE INTEGRATION -- PUBLIC POLICY MAKING      (25%)

Growth of government (Hayek & Keynes);  a Political Economics and Public Policy perspective demonstrating a holistic systems understanding of domestic politics and how this connects to global policy concerns.

The World Stage & Foreign Policy Making; International Organizations & World Order

Exploration of what it takes to find inspiration and skills to engage in action to make effective change in local community and around the world.

The Future ...whither democracy and the American Republic in the evolution of the modern world system.

11B. LAB CONTENT:
N/A
12. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION (List methods used to present course content.)
  1. Directed Study
  2. Discussion
  3. Distance Education
  4. Field Experience
  5. Field Trips
  6. Individualized Instruction
  7. Lecture
  8. Multimedia Content
  9. Observation and Demonstration
  10. Projects
  11. Service Learning
  12. Threaded Discussions
  13. Visiting Lecturers
  14. Other (Specify)
  15. Activity
  16. Critique

  17. Other Methods:
    Critical Pedagogy Methods of Instruction linkages to exit skills by three indices (A, B, & C), are addressed as follows: A]] Knowledge Mastery Index One include: Lecture, Mediated Learning, Multimedia Content, Observation and Demonstration, Service Learning, Threaded Discussions (in On-Line version only), Interaction & Discussion in class, Field Trips, and Visiting Lecturers B]] Critical Political Thinking Proficiency Index Two include: Service Learning, Projects, Activity, Critique, Directed Study, Study Group Interaction & Discussion, and Field Experience C]] Socio-Political Personal Efficacy Index Three include: Individualized Instruction, Service Learning, Critique, Directed Study, Mentor Interaction & Discussion, and Field Experience.
13. ASSIGNMENTS: 0.00 hours/week (List all assignments, including library assignments. Requires two (2) hours of independent work outside of class for each unit/weekly lecture hour. Outside assignments are not required for lab-only courses, although they can be given.)

Out-of-class Assignments:
Assignments are linked to department Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) assessment protocols. A]] Assignments for Knowledge Mastery Index One include: 1) objective examinations; 2) written assignments (e.g. papers), 3) subjective Portfolio Project (comprised of comprehensive notes, self reflective journal responses, issues and concepts analysis, and annotated articles), and 4) class discussion. B]] Assignments for Critical Political Thinking Proficiency Index Two include: 1) written assignments (e.g. papers), 2) subjective Portfolio Project (comprised of comprehensive notes, self reflective journal responses, issues and concepts analysis, and annotated articles), 3) class discussion, and 4) group projects. C]] Assignments for Socio-Political Personal Efficacy Index Three include: 1) subjective Portfolio Project (comprised of comprehensive notes, self reflective journal responses, issues and concepts analysis, and annotated articles), 2) class discussion, and 3) individual and group projects.


ASSIGNMENTS ARE: (See definition of college level):
Primarily College Level
14. STUDENT ASSESSMENT: (Grades are based on):
ESSAY (Includes "blue book" exams and any written assignment of sufficient length and complexity to require students to select and organize ideas, to explain and support the ideas, and to demonstrate critical thinking skills.)
NON-COMPUTATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVING (Critical thinking should be demonstrated by solving unfamiliar problems via various strategies.)
SKILL DEMONSTRATION
MULTIPLE CHOICE
ESSAY (Includes "blue book" exams and any written assignment of sufficient length and complexity to require students to select and organize ideas, to explain and support the ideas, and to demonstrate critical thinking skills.)
OTHER (Describe):
This course utilizes an assessment protocol derived from the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) instrument in the discipline of applied psychology as applied in political science, applied to each of three indices, as follows: A]] Foundational Knowledge Index One is assessed through: 1) objective scores on examinations; and 2) subjective GAF scoring of: Projects (e.g. protfolios) and other writing assignments (revised comprehensive notes, self reflective journal responses, analysis of issues and concepts (e.g. in research papers), and annotated articles analyzed), and class discussion, concept analysis - in portfolio projects). B]] Critical Political Thinking Index Two is assessed through subjective GAF scoring of: response & research papers, comprehensive notes, self reflective journal responses, analysis of issues and concepts (e.g. in annotated articles, discussion, and portfolio projects). C]] Psycho-Social-Political Personal Efficacy Index Three is assessed through subjective GAF scoring of response & research papers, comprehensive notes, self reflective journal responses; analysis of issues and concepts (e.g. in annotated articles, discussion, and portfolio projects).
15. TEXTS, READINGS, AND MATERIALS
  A. Textbooks:
 
  • Brown, Lester. 2009. Plan B 4.0 W. W. Norton
  • Graham, Bob. 2010. America:The owner's manual - making America work for you 1. CQ Press
  • Ira Katznelson, Mark Kesselman & Alan Draper. 2010. The Politics of Power: A Critical Introduction to American Government 6. WW Norton & Company
  • Janda, Berry, Goldman, Hula. 2012. The Challenge of Democracy 8. Houghton Mifflin
  • Orwell, George. 1950. 1984 Signet Classics
    Rationale: Classic Text totalitarian systems dynamics - to be utilized in guiding counter action in aspiring citizens
 
  • Instructor generated course readings and handout packet – updated annually
  • Current news media sources in various modalities supporting case study & current events discussions
 

*Date is required: Transfer institutions require current publication date(s) within 5 years of outline addition/update.

  B. Additional Resources:
 
  • Library/LRC Materials and Services:

    The instructor, in consultation with a librarian, has reviewed the materials and services of the College Library/LRC in the subject areas related to the proposed new course
  • Are print materials adequate?     No
  • Are nonprint materials adequate?     Yes
  • Are electronic/online resources available?     Yes
  • Are services adequate?     Yes
  • Specific materials and/or services needed have been identified and discussed. Librarian comments:
    Contacted instructor about discussing online resources and recommendations for new print/circulating materials
  C. Readings listed in A and B above are: (See definition of college level):
 

Primarily college level

16. DESIGNATE OCCUPATIONAL CODE:
E - Non-Occupational
17. LEVEL BELOW TRANSFER:
Y - Not Applicable
18. CALIFORNIA CLASSIFICATION CODE:
Y - Credit Course
19. NON CREDIT COURSE CATEGORY:
Y - Not Applicable
20. FUNDING AGENCY CATEGORY:
Not Applicable - Not Applicable
SUPPLEMENTAL PAGE

Use only if additional space is needed. (Type the item number which is to be continued, followed by "continued." Show the page number in the blank at the bottom of the page. If the item being continued is on page 2 of the outline, the first supplemental page will be "2a." If additional supplemental pages are required for page 2, they are to be numbered as 2b, 2c, etc.)