COLLEGE OF ALAMEDA COURSE OUTLINE

COLLEGE: STATE APPROVAL DATE: 06/05/2013
ORIGINATOR: Crystallee Crain STATE CONTROL NUMBER: CCC00059218
BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVAL DATE: 05/24/2011
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE APPROVAL DATE: 03/16/2010
CURRENT EFFECTIVE DATE:
 
DIVISION/DEPARTMENT:

1. REQUESTED CREDIT CLASSIFICATION:
  Credit - Degree Applicable
Course is not a basic skills course.
Program Applicable
2. DEPT/COURSE NO: 3. COURSE TITLE:
  POSCI 035   Introduction to Community Violence Prevention
4. COURSE: COA Course Changes only in Non-Catalog Info   TOP NO. 2199.00*
5. UNITS: 3.000   HRS/WK LEC: 3.00 Total: 52.50
  HRS/WK LAB:

6. NO. OF TIMES OFFERED AS SELETED TOPIC:       AVERAGE ENROLLMENT:
7. JUSTIFICATION FOR COURSE:
  To meet the expressed need from community partners regarding issues of violence: course will be a part of a certificate in violence prevention.
8. COURSE/CATALOG DESCRIPTION
  Introduction to social history and political consciousness around the conditions that create and perpetuate violence in urban communities; historical and contemporary issues around violence and the variety of impacts it has on society; review of approaches toward healing and revitalizing communities that are affected by violence; the field of violence prevention; overview of various intervention strategies to prevent violence and build healthy communities.
9. OTHER CATALOG INFORMATION
 
  1. Modular: No     If yes, how many modules:
  2. Open entry/open exit: No
  3. Grading Policy: Both Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
  4. Eligible for credit by Exam: No
  5. Repeatable according to state guidelines: No
  6. Required for degree/certificate (specify):
    New - Certificate of Proficiency in Violence Prevention
  7. Meets GE/Transfer requirements (specify):
  8. C-ID Number: Expiration Date:

  9. Are there prerequisites/corequisites/recommended preparation for this course? No
  10. Acceptable for Credit: CSU/UC
10. LIST STUDENT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (EXIT SKILLS): (Objectives must define the exit skills required of students and include criteria identified in Items 12, 14, and 15 - critical thinking, essay writing, problem solving, written/verbal communications, computational skills, working with others, workplace needs, SCANS competencies, all aspects of the industry, etc.)(See SCANS/All Aspects of Industry Worksheet.)

Students will be able to:
  1. Identify the various types of violence that exist in urban communities
  2. Describe the multiple conditions that create and perpetuate violence in urban communities
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of historical and contemporary issues around violence and its impact on society
  4. Explore different theories and explain different approaches toward healing and revitalizing communities that are affected by violence
  5. Describe and explain the landscape of the field of violence prevention
  6. Describe the various intervention strategies to prevent violence and build healthy communities
  7. Construct a level of political consciousness around urban violence, peace work and violence prevention within the community
  8. Articulate and evaluate a concept of a career direction in the field of violence prevention
11A. COURSE CONTENT: List major topics to be covered. This section must be more than listing chapter headings from a textbook. Outline the course content, including essential topics, major subdivisions, and supporting details. It should include enough information so that a faculty member from any institution will have a clear understanding of the material taught in the course and the approximate length of time devoted to each. There should be congruence among the catalog description, lecture and/or lab content, student performance objectives, and the student learning outcomes. List percent of time spent on each topic; ensure percentages total 100%.

LECTURE CONTENT:

I        Introduction to Violence in Urban Communities (35%)

Epidemiology of Violence – What is violence? Examination of the different forms of violence (domestic violence, child and elder abuse, homicide, youth and community violence, suicide, hate violence, police brutality) and how they are perpetuated through systems of oppression

Definition of Community – How is community defined? What societal, cultural, institutions, education, and/or family factors contribute to community? Who are critical people in community formation?

Conditions that Create and Perpetuate Violence in urban communities, from personal to structural levels; Exploration of risk factors that contribute to violence, including: poverty, unemployment, oppression, substance abuse, educational failures, fragmented families, mental illness, neighborhood disorganization, feelings of powerlessness, shame and disrespect and witnessing or experiencing past violence; Johan Galtung and structural justice; Rene Girard’s theory of violence

Examination of the Social Context of Urban Violence and the Political Landscape that creates conditions that foster and breed violent societies; Examination of poverty and social disorganization; Exploration of the connection between poverty and violence

Historical and Contemporary Issues around Violence and its impact on society, such as the war on drugs, drug laws, disproportionate minority confinement, criminalization of youth of color, prison industrial complex, and the institutionalized effects of poverty and racism

II     Introduction to Community Development and the Field of Violence Prevention (35%)

Approaches toward Healing and Revitalizing Communities that are affected by violence: Exploration of the public health model of violence prevention versus community based model; What is healing and resiliency? Examination of resiliency factors that are protective against violence, including: economic capital, meaningful opportunities for participation, positive attachments and relationships, social capital, services and institutions, ethnic, racial and intergroup relations, good physical and mental health; Examination of the context in which healing occurs: What is the connection of healing to mental health? How do we heal individually and collectively? What is the role for leadership in healing? How is the concept of healing a strategy to prevent violence?

Landscape of Community Based Violence Prevention Practitioners - Overview of the actors and organizations involved in the field of violence prevention, including community based and grassroots organizations and public agencies, such as county government, schools and school districts, and local police and sheriff departments

 III     Intervention Strategies and Building Healthy Communities (15%)

Strategies Toward Preventing Violence and Building Healthy Communities – Overview of violence prevention theories and the intervention strategies that emerge from their practice, such as restorative justice, street outreach, community development, conflict resolution and case management

IV     Career and Leadership Development (15%)

Assessment of Career Opportunities – Student development of an understanding of who they are and want to be as violence prevention practitioners; Exploration of the skills needed for various career pathways in the field of violence prevention and assessment of how one’s interests  and aptitudes match those skills

Leadership – Introduction to the concept of leadership; Examination of the different types of leadership, including process leader, task leader, ethical leader, strategic leader, and inspirational leader (Wellstone Politics); Self-reflection on the forms of leadership that best match one’s aptitudes

11B. LAB CONTENT:
N/A
12. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION (List methods used to present course content.)
  1. Discussion
  2. Field Experience
  3. Field Trips
  4. Activity
  5. Lecture
  6. Multimedia Content
  7. Projects
  8. Service Learning
  9. Visiting Lecturers
  10. Other (Specify)

  11. Other Methods:
    Identify the various types of violence that exist in urban communities (Activity, Discussion) Describe the multiple conditions that create and perpetuate violence in urban communities (Lecture, Field Exp) Demonstrate an understanding of historical and contemporary issues around violence and its impact on society (Lec, Field Trip) Explore different theories and explain different approaches toward healing and revitalizing communities that are affected by violence (SL, Multimedia Content) Describe and explain the landscape of the field of violence prevention (Lec, Visiting Lecturers, Projects) Describe the various intervention strategies to prevent violence and build healthy communities (Lec, Discussion) Construct a level of political consciousness around urban violence, peace work and violence prevention within the community (Discussion, Lec, Field Exp) Articulate and evaluate a concept of a career direction in the field of violence prevention (Activity, Lec, Visiting Lecturers)
13. ASSIGNMENTS: 0.00 hours/week (List all assignments, including library assignments. Requires two (2) hours of independent work outside of class for each unit/weekly lecture hour. Outside assignments are not required for lab-only courses, although they can be given.)

Out-of-class Assignments:
Community Assessment /(30 points) Ideas to Application: Video Analysis /(40 points) Commentary on the Alameda County Blueprint for Violence Prevention /(100 points) Practitioner Interviews (2/(35 each = 70 points) List of Violence Prevention Organizations Creative Solutions for Change Poster Presentations/(100 points) In-class powerpoint - group work assignment Grant Writing Project – (individually or in groups) /(100 points)


ASSIGNMENTS ARE: (See definition of college level):
Primarily College Level
14. STUDENT ASSESSMENT: (Grades are based on):
ESSAY (Includes "blue book" exams and any written assignment of sufficient length and complexity to require students to select and organize ideas, to explain and support the ideas, and to demonstrate critical thinking skills.)
OTHER (Describe):
Community Based Research, self-reflective journal work in class, group work
15. TEXTS, READINGS, AND MATERIALS
  A. Textbooks:
 
  • Boyes-Watson, Carolyn. 2008. Peacemaking Circles & Urban Youth: Bringing Justice Home Living Justice Press
  • Gilligan, James. 2001. Violence: Our Deadly Epidemic and it’s Causes Thames & Hudson
    Rationale: Text supports the learning outcome of delevoping foundational knowledge in the field of violence prevention. The author explores the causes of violence through dual lenses. The first lens examines violence through a structural framework (via the public health, sociology, and socio-cultural approaches. The second lens explores violence through a psychological framework.
  • Lydia Guy. 2007. An Introduction to Community Development: Activation toEvaluation online. http://www.wcsap.org/sites/www.wcsap.org/files/uploads/documents/CommunityDevelopmentTool2007.pdf
    Rationale: http://www.wcsap.org/sites/www.wcsap.org/files/uploads/documents/CommunityDevelopmentTool2007.pdf This is an applied reading that will help the students see the importance of evaluation as a method of prevention.
  • Prothrow-Stith,Deborah, Spivak, Howard R.. 2003. Murder Is No Accident: Understanding and Preventing Youth Violence in America Jossey-Bass
    Rationale: Text address learning objectives of developing foundational knowledge in the field of violence prevention and developing critical thinking around the context of violence and violence prevention.
  • Tutu, Desmond. 2000. No Future Without Forgiveness Double Day
    Rationale: Text address learning objectives of developing foundational knowledge in the field of violence prevention and developing critical thinking around the context of violence and violence prevention.
 
  • The Prevention Institute. 07-01-2005. A Lifetime Commitment to Violence Prevention: The Alameda County Blue Print. Alameda County
 

*Date is required: Transfer institutions require current publication date(s) within 5 years of outline addition/update.

  B. Additional Resources:
 
  • Library/LRC Materials and Services:

    The instructor, in consultation with a librarian, has reviewed the materials and services of the College Library/LRC in the subject areas related to the proposed new course
  • Are print materials adequate?     No
  • Are nonprint materials adequate?     No
  • Are electronic/online resources available?     Yes
  • Are services adequate?     Yes
  • Specific materials and/or services needed have been identified and discussed. Librarian comments:
    Online electronic materials adequate (e.g. EBSCOhost), but I urge you on a continuing basis to recommend reading and research materials in this subject area to help update and enhance library collections. Also see me for a more in depth look at article databases and library class instruction based on your specific assignments.
  C. Readings listed in A and B above are: (See definition of college level):
 

Primarily college level

16. DESIGNATE OCCUPATIONAL CODE:
C - Occupational
17. LEVEL BELOW TRANSFER:
Y - Not Applicable
18. CALIFORNIA CLASSIFICATION CODE:
19. NON CREDIT COURSE CATEGORY:
Y - Not Applicable
20. FUNDING AGENCY CATEGORY:
Not Applicable - Not Applicable
SUPPLEMENTAL PAGE

Use only if additional space is needed. (Type the item number which is to be continued, followed by "continued." Show the page number in the blank at the bottom of the page. If the item being continued is on page 2 of the outline, the first supplemental page will be "2a." If additional supplemental pages are required for page 2, they are to be numbered as 2b, 2c, etc.)