Course Outline: College of Alameda

COLLEGE OF ALAMEDA COURSE OUTLINE

COLLEGE: STATE APPROVAL DATE: 03/15/2012
ORIGINATOR: John Drew Burgess STATE CONTROL NUMBER: CCC000530167
BOARD OF TRUSTEES APPROVAL DATE: 05/08/2008
CURRICULUM COMMITTEE APPROVAL DATE: 03/01/2016
CURRENT EFFECTIVE DATE:
 
DIVISION/DEPARTMENT:

1. REQUESTED CREDIT CLASSIFICATION:
  Credit - Degree Applicable
Course is not a basic skills course.
Program Applicable
2. DEPT/COURSE NO: 3. COURSE TITLE:
  ART 122   World Art
4. COURSE: COA Course Changes only in Non-Catalog Info   TOP NO. 1002.00
5. UNITS: 3.000   HRS/WK LEC: 3.00 Total: 52.50
  HRS/WK LAB:

6. NO. OF TIMES OFFERED AS SELETED TOPIC:       AVERAGE ENROLLMENT:
7. JUSTIFICATION FOR COURSE:
  This course explores the art and cultures of the world. The emphasis is on a range of artistic pursuits of many peoples. The course fulfills the non-western art history requirement of the AA-T Art History degree. Transfers to CSU and UC.
8. COURSE/CATALOG DESCRIPTION
  Survey of the origins and development of the painting, sculpture, architecture, artifacts of the great civilizations from around the world.
9. OTHER CATALOG INFORMATION
 
  1. Modular: No     If yes, how many modules:
  2. Open entry/open exit: No
  3. Grading Policy: Both Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass
  4. Eligible for credit by Exam: No
  5. Repeatable according to state guidelines: No
  6. Required for degree/certificate (specify):
    Existing
  7. Meets GE/Transfer requirements (specify):
    Transfers to CSU and UC. World Art is a course within the AA-T degree of the College of Alameda program.World Art fullfills a requirement of the AA degree.
  8. C-ID Number: Expiration Date:

  9. Are there prerequisites/corequisites/recommended preparation for this course? No
10. LIST STUDENT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (EXIT SKILLS): (Objectives must define the exit skills required of students and include criteria identified in Items 12, 14, and 15 - critical thinking, essay writing, problem solving, written/verbal communications, computational skills, working with others, workplace needs, SCANS competencies, all aspects of the industry, etc.)(See SCANS/All Aspects of Industry Worksheet.)

Students will be able to:
  1. Apply critical thinking and problem solving in identifying and distinguishing selective artistic styles of the world including smaller scale societies.
  2. Analyze, discuss, and differentiate works of art and architecture in terms of historical context and cultural values
  3. Analyze, discuss, and differentiate the roles of art, architecture, and the artist from a selection of world cultures.
  4. Appraise the iconography of different cultures based on a thorough knowledge of different symbols/forms.
  5. Interpret how social, political, and religious ideas affect art.
  6. Explain the possible meaning(s) of the prehistoric art of world cultures.
  7. Reconstruct in oral and written analysis the chronology of artistic periods.
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of elements and principles of artistic form to express the way artists of many places and localities created/create works of art.
11A. COURSE CONTENT: List major topics to be covered. This section must be more than listing chapter headings from a textbook. Outline the course content, including essential topics, major subdivisions, and supporting details. It should include enough information so that a faculty member from any institution will have a clear understanding of the material taught in the course and the approximate length of time devoted to each. There should be congruence among the catalog description, lecture and/or lab content, student performance objectives, and the student learning outcomes. List percent of time spent on each topic; ensure percentages total 100%.

LECTURE CONTENT:



Art is examined as a reflection of each culture.  Parallels between art of world peoples is emphasized. Concepts of art related to human beliefs, storytelling, civilization, social organization, human concerns, and spiritual orientation are described and discussed.

Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation of Art of the:


1: Rock Paintings and Petroglyphs
      Rock Paintings in Australia
      The Sahara
      Native American Petroglyphs of the Plains

2: Topics in Chinese Art
      Neolithic to First Empire
      The Tomb of Emperor Qin
      Chinese Characters, Calligraphy, and Painting

3: South Asia: The Indus Valley Civilization
      Indus Valley Civilization
      The Origin of Buddhism
      Buddhist Architecture and Sculpture

4: Buddhist Art in India and China
      Rock-Cut Architecture
      Gupta Sculpture
      The Ajanta Caves
      Buddhist Expansion in China
      Images of the Buddha Beyond India and China

5: The Expansion of Islam
      Islam
      Persian Miniature Painting
      The Mughal Dynasty of India

6: Buddhist and Hindu Developments in East Asia
      Buddhist Paradise Sects
      The Pagoda
      The Buddhist Monastery: Horyu-ji
      The Vishnu Temple
      The Orissan Temple
      Synthesis of Buddhism and Hinduism at Angkor

7: Mesoamerican and the Andes
      Mesoamerica
      Olmec
      Teotihauc├ín
      Maya
      The Aztec Empire
      Art of the Andes

8: Aspects of Northwest Coast and Native North American Art
      Haida
      The United States Regions

9: Japanese Woodblock Prints
      Ukiyo-e
      Utagawa Kunisada
      Utagawa Toypkuni
      Kitagawa Utamaro
      Keisei Eisen

10: Aspects of Oceanic Art
      Polynesia
      Melanesia

11: Africa: The Royal Art of Benin
      The Oba and the Queen Mother
      Portuguese Influence and Palace Architecture
      Protective Devices

The Lecture content for the World Art class may be supplemented with additional components of the cultures listed above and additional readings. The content of the course is an exploration of the way of life of world peoples that is inclusive of a multiplicity of styles. The World Art class content is a method to examine, evaluate, question and synthesize the production of art.

11B. LAB CONTENT:
There is not a lab component.
12. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION (List methods used to present course content.)
  1. Projects
  2. Other (Specify)
  3. Discussion
  4. Lecture

  5. Other Methods:
    Class meetings include presentations of art with audio visual materials such as slides and films. The class is engaged with lectures about art and discussion.Group break-outs are intermittently incorporated so that students may explore problems together----such as a theme for an essay. Additional methodology: 1. Assigned reading and class discussions. 2. The viewing of films related to art of varied social groups. The lecture material of slides of historical art is supplemented with films that engage the student in a contemporary way. Films are selected that resonate with historical art in terms of the ongoing problems and questions of humanity. 3. An optional class field trip to a museum. 4. Instructor led lab on writing a term paper or essay writing for tests. 5. Instrutor demonstration or discussion of art techniques. 6. When possible the instructor presents actual artworks for the students to see.
13. ASSIGNMENTS: 0.00 hours/week (List all assignments, including library assignments. Requires two (2) hours of independent work outside of class for each unit/weekly lecture hour. Outside assignments are not required for lab-only courses, although they can be given.)

Out-of-class Assignments:
1.Reading in textbook and supplementary reading from online sources and library books based on assigned problems and individual interest within field of study. 2.Written stylistic analysis of works of art in a local museum such as the Oakland Museum of California, the Asian Art Museum and De Young Museum in San Francisco. Writing may be assigned in the form of a journal. 3.Essay or term project appropriate to the broad range of ideas incorporated within the field of art, an individualized analysis of a period of art or artists, or a tailored idea concerning the creative ability of humanity. The course will include critical analysis of the themes, ideas and cultural manifestations of works of art.


ASSIGNMENTS ARE: (See definition of college level):
Primarily College Level
14. STUDENT ASSESSMENT: (Grades are based on):
ESSAY (Includes "blue book" exams and any written assignment of sufficient length and complexity to require students to select and organize ideas, to explain and support the ideas, and to demonstrate critical thinking skills.)
NON-COMPUTATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVING (Critical thinking should be demonstrated by solving unfamiliar problems via various strategies.)
MULTIPLE CHOICE
OTHER (Describe):
1.Essay questions are evaluated for the ability to compare and contrast works of art, to synthesize concepts of history,and to structure a relevant argument coupled with a thesis. 2. The ability to appraise works of art,historical events, themes and structured ideas is evaluated in the form of a multiple choice test.Questions are composed to concretely measure the comprehension of broad concepts of art history. 3.Written assignments given to student groups are evaluated for problem solving ability in an active learning environment. 4. Formulative skills in the comprehension of works of art is assessed with identification style testing. Distinguishing symbolic aspects of artistic form is evaluated. 5. Question and free response testing is evaluated to measure the reasoning capability in regard to problems with more than one answer.
15. TEXTS, READINGS, AND MATERIALS
  A. Textbooks:
 
  • Anderson, Richard and Field, Karen. Art In Small Scale Societies. 1st edition Prentice Hall, 1993.
    Rationale: The textbook contains numerous articles concerning smaller social groups with detailed study.
  • Kampen-O'Riley, Michael. Art Beyond the West. 3rd edition Pearson, 2013.
  • Kleiner. Gardner's Art through the Ages. 14 Wadsworth, 2013.
  • Mackensie, Lynn. Non-Western Art a brief guide. 2nd edition Prentice Hall, 2001.
    Rationale: The text is concise and explains the subject well. The text is student friendly with discussion and review ideas coupled with suggestions for further reading.
  • Schneider Adams, Laurie. World Views: Topics in Non-Western Art. 4th edition McGraw Hill, 2004.
    Rationale: The text is analytical and expressive of world art suitable for current college level study.
 
  • Students will utilize online sources for research including museums such as the Asian Art Museum and the De Young Museum in San Francisco.
 

*Date is required: Transfer institutions require current publication date(s) within 5 years of outline addition/update.

  B. Additional Resources:
 
  • Library/LRC Materials and Services:

    The instructor, in consultation with a librarian, has reviewed the materials and services of the College Library/LRC in the subject areas related to the proposed new course
  • Are print materials adequate?     Yes
  • Are nonprint materials adequate?     No
  • Are electronic/online resources available?     Yes
  • Are services adequate?     Yes
  • Specific materials and/or services needed have been identified and discussed. Librarian comments:
    Coursework assignments may include library services
  C. Readings listed in A and B above are: (See definition of college level):
 

Primarily college level

16. DESIGNATE OCCUPATIONAL CODE:
E - Non-Occupational
17. LEVEL BELOW TRANSFER:
Y - Not Applicable
18. CALIFORNIA CLASSIFICATION CODE:
Y - Credit Course
19. NON CREDIT COURSE CATEGORY:
Y - Not Applicable
20. FUNDING AGENCY CATEGORY:
Not Applicable - Not Applicable
SUPPLEMENTAL PAGE

Use only if additional space is needed. (Type the item number which is to be continued, followed by "continued." Show the page number in the blank at the bottom of the page. If the item being continued is on page 2 of the outline, the first supplemental page will be "2a." If additional supplemental pages are required for page 2, they are to be numbered as 2b, 2c, etc.)

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STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
  1. Outcome: Evaluation of the methods, materials,and meanings of world art.
    This outcome maps to the following Institution Outcomes:
    • • Solve problems and make decisions in life and work using critical thinking, quantitative reasoning, community resources, and civil engagement.

    Assessment: exam

  2. Outcome: Examines themes of art in the context of varied periods and cultures.
    This outcome maps to the following Institution Outcomes:
    • • Engage in respectful interpersonal communications, acknowledging ideas and values of diverse individuals that represent different ethnic, racial, cultural, and gender expressions.

    Assessment: essay

  3. Outcome: Assembles a working knowledge of the art of the world.
    This outcome maps to the following Institution Outcomes:
    • • Exhibit aesthetic reflection to promote, participate and contribute to human development, expression, creativity, and curiosity.

    Assessment: student project